people communicating in different ways representing neutral language

The Power of Neutral Language: Time to Think First, and Communicate Second

We’ve all said things we regret. The issue is never if we said something we later regretted. Rather, how we handled it. I recommend a simple, I’m sorry,” without explanation, since offering up the reason often seems like an excuse.  Shortening the statement “I’m sorry I said that, but I was angry,” to “I’m sorry I said that” is clear, brief, and sincere.

Courageous Communicaiton: A Return to Civility cover

Preface to “Courageous Communication: A Return to Civility”

we appear to be living in a world where alternate facts, conspiracy theories, and opinions masquerading as facts are inescapable. All of this, and no doubt more, has led to unsettling times, where civility appears to have gone by the wayside. How pervasive is this incivility? Are we all observing or experiencing the same degree of discourteous conduct that seems prevalent, or at least tends to dominate the media? Is it unique to the United States? To answer these questions, we sent a survey out worldwide.

I thought I knew what the results would reveal. I was wrong.

The great divide and social media saturation

The Conundrum of Social Media Saturation: Who Really Comprises the Majority?

Regular Newsletter followers will know that I struggled with my second book – now nearly completed – entitled “Can’t We All Just Get Along,” Rodney King, Courageous Communication: a Return to Civility. The reason for my struggle was the result of a succession of surveys, responded to worldwide, with what I initially thought were startling, surprising, even shocking results.